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. >>> we turn next overseas now and to afghanistan, whereree are getting our first look tonight at grizzly new images from inside that luxury hotel in kabul, swarmed by suicide bombers who went on that deadly attack. in an abc news exclusive, nick schifrin tonight takes us inside. >> reporter: abc news filmed the first images from inside the intercontinental. the attackers blew themselves up in bedrooms, in stairwrwls, in the hallway. the top floor, completely destroyed by fire. on the roof, a massive firefight. the attackers brought bags full of red bull and water so they could fight for hours. for the first time, a senior afghan police official admitted to abc news that his men wouldn't have retaken the hotel without the help of these nato special forces. later this month, afghan forces are supposed to take responsibility for security in parts of the country. but their response to this attack raises questions about whether they're ready. nick schifrin, abc news, kabul. >> nick, our thanks to you. >>> and it's those images that have authorities here at home on high alert this fourth. comb
service. today was all about a moment in afghanistan when petry was severely wounded, shot in both legs, looking at a live grenade that could have hurt his fellow soldiers. abc's john donvan on what he did. >> reporter: above and beyond. that's where leroy petry went in may 2008, afghanistan, his seventh tour of duty. these pictures, from before he found out what he was made of. with the true sign of that today being in all the ceremony, a certain discomfort at the attention. >> to be singled out is very humbling. >> reporter: perhaps, yes, for a kid who used to get into fights and who almost failed in high school. but who, out there, picked up a live enemy grenade to toss it away to save his comrades. it cost him his right hand, but he's alive, rare fororedal of honor winners. who usually are honored posthumously. but there's also this. leroy petry decided he's not done. and when he re-enlisted, he took the oath with his right hand. his new one. john donvan, abc news, washington. >> and we want to honor him, too. >>> and, still ahead on "world news," one thing you may want to buy to he
watch. >> return to the bay area of a fallen hero from afghanistan. >> tonight parking lot scuffle outside of our studios could put an end to a rip off targeting drivers throughout the city. good evening, everyone. >> it's a scream that is easy to pull off. after he sue -- you see how it works it will never work on you, again. vick, there is not much to it but it seems effective. >> we're talking about a serial conartist, praying on drivers pulling into lots like this one. this parking lot where he was arrested just yesterday, but chances are he'll be back here soon.
or wife still serving overseas. tonight here abc news's mike boettcher in eastern afghanistan with some troops marking their last holiday away before coming home, and they have very simple wishes about who and what it is they want to see first when they get here. mike? >> reporter: david, it's another windy, dusty day at forward operating base shahana where soldiers from the 101st airborne have spent the past year, they missed labor day, thanksgiving, christmas, easter and memorial day. and now, there is one last holiday to get through before they go home, the fourth of july. >> blackjack where you at? >> reporter: this unit has a rich history, 101st airborne named a band of brothers during world war ii. today they took a break, knowing that home is coming soon. they can picture it. what do you miss most about home on fourth of july? >> believe it or not, my grill. >> good barbecue. >> good barbecue. >> sierra madre has a fourth of july parade every year and it's cool. everybody in the town comes out. a lot of fun. so, that's what i miss this year. >> miss the lake, definitely. green gr
deploy and be a muslim. >> reporter: 21-year-old naser abdo didn't want to fight in afghanistan, but sources say he was more than willing to cause bloodshed at home. after being arrested, he told officers he wanted to get even with the military and chose ft. hood because of the 2009 attack here where major nidal hasan allegedly killed 13 and wounded 30. he told them he wasn't going to target the military post, but a nearby restaurant popular with soldiers. he told them his plan was to set off two bombs, then shoot any survivors. police say the attack was imminent. >> we would probably be here today giving you a different briefing had he not been stopped. >> reporter: greg ebert is the man who stopped him. a former marine and police officer who works at this killeen gun store. he got suspicious when abdo arrived in a cab on tuesday, then bought six pounds of gun powder, three boxes of shotgun ammunition and a magazine for a semiautomatic pistol. he paid $250 in cash. >> when somebody comes in, especially to a business like this, and makes a purchase and doesn't know what he's buy
, because of norway's involvement in afghanistan, nato in libya, perhaps this was al qaeda or a libyan reaction, but it turns out to be a lone norwegian, who was arrested, believed to be involved in the bombing and the shooting. said to be in his 30s, a military veteran who has grievances with the government and now talking to police, a kind of norway version of timothy mcveigh, the american military vet who blew up thehe federal building in oklahoma city in the '90s. >> so, what do you know about the bomb itself? >> reporter: well, the bomb went off. it is not as high explosives as they thought. a homemade bomb. they also found several other undetonated bombs on that island at the youth camp, which he had taken with him. >> we're looking at the debris right now. that shattered glass. and we all began thinking about buildings here in this country today and that video of the practice run with the barriers we set up in front of so many buildings across this country. >> reporter: well, the u.s. has been very vigilant in protecting government buildings. it probably couldn't happen in the u
soldiers killed in iraq and afghanistan. paul mcmullan was a reporter and editor at "the news of the world." >> it was certainly a really commonplace practice. >> reporter: this scandal reaches far beyond the murdoch empire. this week, it was revealed that london police were selling the paper scoops in exchange for bribes. there are even allegations that the prime minister, a close friend of murdoch, turned a blind eye, even though he knew what was going on. >> and jeffrey there, even talking of arrests tonight? >> reporter: oh, that's right, diane. a huge criminal investigation is under way involving dozens of police investigators. we are told we should brace for an avalanche of arrests involving police themselves, as well as reporters and editors. the first arrests could come as soon as tomorrow. one of the former editors of "the news of the world." >> jeffrey kofman reporting on the outrage in london tonight. >>> and after 997 days behind bars, casey anthony is getting ready to go home. her lightning fast release putting new pressure on the jurors who acquitted. abc's ashleigh banfield
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7